If you're a beginner, you'll love an option like the Yamaha RBX170 Bass or the Epiphone Thunderbird IV Bass. These bass guitars offer great tone and style all at a price you can easily afford. Best of all, their durable construction will withstand all the paces an eager learner will put them through. Maybe you're already an established player and are looking for a new challenge? If that's the case, you'll love the American Deluxe Jazz Bass V 5-String Electric Bass from Fender. This beautiful five string is loaded with updated electronics and Noiseless pickups for a tight low-end response you're definitely going to appreciate. Its alder body helps to give it a wonderfully clear tone that any bassist will want to hear every time they strap in. You'll also find acoustic basses in this section such as the EAB Acoustic-Electric Bass from Dean and the stunning A5 Ultra Bass Fretless SA 5-String Acoustic-Electric Bass Guitar from Godin. These basses are perfect for performers who demand the ultimate versatility. It won't matter where you're gigging with these gorgeous basses, you'll have the freedom to play them acoustic or plug in for a louder sound that can fill larger venues. The bass has always been an unsung hero in popular music, but that doesn't mean it doesn't play a crucial note. With any of the top quality basses available here, you'll have no trouble keeping the band in the groove and having them sound tighter than ever before.
Timbales are tuned much higher than a tom of the same diameter, and normally played with very light, thin, non-tapered sticks. They have relatively thin heads and a very different tone than a tom, but are used by some drummers/percussionists to extend the tom range upwards. Alternatively, they can be fitted with tom heads and tuned as shallow concert toms. Attack timbales and mini timbales are reduced-diameter timbales designed for drum kit usage, the smaller diameter allowing for thicker heads providing the same pitch and head tension. They are recognizable in 2010s genres and in more traditional forms of Latin, reggae & numerous world music styles. Timbales were also used on occasion by Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham. Gong drums are a rare extension to a drum kit. The single-headed mountable drum appears similar to a bass drum (sizing around 20–24 inches in diameter), but has the same purpose as that of a floor tom. Similarly, most hand drum percussion cannot be played easily or suitably with drum sticks without risking damage to the head and to the bearing edge, which is not protected by a metal drum rim, like a snare or tom. For use in a drum kit, they may be fitted with a metal drum head and played with care, or played by hand.

A drum solo is an instrumental section that highlights the virtuosity, skill and musical creativity of the drummer. While other instrument solos such as guitar solos are typically accompanied by the other rhythm section instruments (e.g., bass guitar and electric guitar), for most drum solos, all the other band members stop playing so that all of the audience's focus will be on the drummer. In some drum solos, the other rhythm section instrumentalists may play "punches" at certain points–sudden, loud chords of a short duration. Drum solos are common in jazz, but they are also used in a number of rock genres, such as heavy metal and progressive rock. During drum solos, drummers have a great deal of creative freedom, and drummers often use the entire drum kit. In live concerts, drummers may be given long drum solos, even in genres where drum solos are rare on singles.
With a basswood body, this can just be the best option if you are trying the guitar for the first time since it has got a short sustain. In addition to this, the guitar can be used for more complicated sounds. If you’re not really sure the kind of music you’ll be focusing on, be sure to try out this guitar. It has twenty frets. Rosewood fretboard and basswood body make it a durable guitar to play on your next rock performance. The maple neck is another good thing about the product.
A three-piece drum set is the most basic set. A conventional three-piece kit consists of a bass drum, a 14" diameter snare drum, 12"–14" hi-hats, a single 12" diameter hanging tom, 8"–9" in depth, and a suspended cymbal, in the range of 14"–18", both mounted on the bass drum. These kits were common in the 1950s and 1960s and are still used in the 2010s in small acoustic dance bands. It is a common configuration for kits sold through mail order, and, with smaller sized drums and cymbals, for kits for children.

Cymbals of any type used to provide an accent rather than a regular pattern or groove are known as accent cymbals. While any cymbal can be used to provide an accent, the term is applied more correctly to cymbals for which the main purpose is to provide an accent. Accent cymbals include chime cymbals, small-bell domed cymbals or those with a clear sonorous/oriental chime to them like specialized crash and splash cymbals and many china types too, particularly the smaller or thinner ones.
An uncommon form of digital piano that resemble a grand piano, usually with a more precision keyboard action and high-quality sound system built into the unit's cabinet in a similar manner as the strings on a grand piano. These pianos are mostly high-end novelty models offered by only small number of manufacturers, and often has higher prices than an average acoustic piano.
A fill is a departure from the repetitive rhythm pattern in a song. A drum fill is used to "fill in" the space between the end of one verse and the beginning of another verse or chorus. Fills vary from a simple few strokes on a tom or snare, to a distinctive rhythm played on the hi-hat, to sequences several bars long that are short virtuosic drum solos. As well as adding interest and variation to the music, fills serve an important function in preparing and indicating significant changes of sections in songs and linking sections. A vocal cue is a short drum fill that introduces a vocal entry. A fill ending with a cymbal crash on beat one is often used to lead into a chorus or verse.
The crash cymbals are usually the strongest accent markers within the kit, marking crescendos and climaxes, vocal entries, and major changes of mood/swells and effects. A crash cymbal is often accompanied by a strong kick on the bass drum pedal, both for musical effect and to support the stroke. It provides a fuller sound and is a commonly taught technique.
An LCD readout and a few more buttons on the control panel would go a long way toward making the keyboard’s options easier to use. The metronome function especially could be more user friendly. It has 10 speed presets, labeled 0-9, with a + and – for adjustment. These are selectable with the Function button and a key press. While practicing and deciding on tempo, most students find it more beneficial to know the exact BPM (beats per minute), which is impossible here using the built-in metronome.

By World War I, drum kits were often marching band-style military bass drums with many percussion items suspended on and around them. Drum kits became a central part of jazz music, especially Dixieland. The modern drum kit was developed in the Vaudeville era during the 1920s in New Orleans.[11] In 1917, a New Orleans band called "The Original Dixieland Jazz Band " recorded jazz tunes that became hits all over the country. These were the first official jazz recordings. Drummers such as Baby Dodds, "Zutty" Singleton and Ray Bauduc had taken the idea of marching rhythms, combining the bass drum and snare drum and "traps", a term used to refer to the percussion instruments associated with immigrant groups, which included miniature cymbals, tom toms, cowbells and woodblocks. They started incorporating these elements with ragtime, which had been popular for a couple of decades, creating an approach which evolved into a jazz drumming style.

In the 1930s, musician and inventor Paul Tutmarc of Seattle, Washington, developed the first electric string bass in its modern form, a fretted instrument designed to be played horizontally. The 1935 sales catalog for Tutmarc's electronic musical instrument company, Audiovox, featured his "Model 736 Bass Fiddle", a four-stringed, solid-bodied, fretted electric bass instrument with a 30 1⁄2-inch (775-millimetre) scale length.[8] The adoption of a guitar's body shape made the instrument easier to hold and transport than any of the existing stringed bass instruments. The addition of frets enabled bassists to play in tune more easily than on fretless acoustic or electric upright basses. Around 100 of these instruments were made during this period.[9]

The bass guitarist sometimes breaks out of the strict rhythm section role to perform bass breaks or bass solos. The types of bass lines used for bass breaks or bass solos vary by style. In a rock band, a bass break may consist of the bassist playing a riff or lick during a pause in the song. In some styles of metal, a bass break may consist of "shred guitar"-style tapping on the bass. In a funk or funk rock band, a bass solo may showcase the bassist's percussive slap and pop playing. In genres such as progressive rock, art rock, or progressive metal, the bass guitar player may play melody lines along with the lead guitar (or vocalist) and perform extended guitar solos.

A well-known bass humbucker is the pickup used on the Music Man series of basses; it has two coils, each with four large polepieces. This style is known as the "MM" pickup for this reason, and many aftermarket pickup manufacturers (companies that make and sell pickups that you can custom-add to your bass) and custom bass builders incorporate these pickups in their designs. The most common configurations are a single pickup at the bridge, two pickups similar in placement to a Jazz Bass, or an MM pickup at the bridge with a single-coil pickup (often a "J") at the neck. These pickups can often be "tapped", meaning one of the two coils can be essentially turned off, giving a sound similar to a single-coil pickup.
Optical pickups are another type of non-magnetic pickup. They use an infrared LED to optically track the movement of the string, similar to the mechanism of modern computer mice, which allows them to reproduce low-frequency tones at high volumes without the "hum" or excessive resonance associated with conventional magnetic pickups. Since optical pickups do not pick up high frequencies or percussive sounds well, they are commonly paired with piezoelectric pickups to fill in the missing frequencies. LightWave Systems builds basses with optical pickups.
The Alesis Recital Pro is $100 less expensive than our runner-up, but it doesn’t sound that way. The built-in sounds are good, and with its touch buttons and LCD readout, the keyboard is the easiest and most intuitive to use of our picks. It doesn’t come with a sustain pedal, so it will require an extra purchase of about $20 to make it fully functional. Although it doesn’t sound quite as good or play quite as well as our main pick, it’s clearly the standout value.

The slap and pop method, or "thumbstyle", most associated with funk, uses tones and percussive sounds achieved by striking, thumping, or "slapping" a string with the thumb and snapping (or "popping") a string or strings with the index or middle fingers. Bassists often interpolate left hand-muted "ghost notes" between the slaps and pops to achieve a rapid percussive effect, and after a note is slapped or popped, the fretting hand may cause other notes to sound by using "hammer-ons", "pull-offs", or a left-hand glissando (slide). Larry Graham of Sly and the Family Stone and Graham Central Station was an early innovator of the slap style, and Louis Johnson of The Brothers Johnson is also credited as an early slap bass player.
Kawai’s exceptional line of digital pianos is the result of a never-ending effort to create the world’s most authentic and innovative digital pianos. Relying on our rich experience in building fine acoustic pianos, Kawai builds digital pianos that offer the finest touch and tone available. Wooden-key actions, Harmonic Imaging sound technology, USB digital audio and the unique Soundboard Speaker System are just a few of the innovations found in our digital pianos and keyboards.
Bassists trying to emulate the sound of a double bass sometimes pluck the strings with their thumb and use palm-muting to create a short, "thumpy" tone. Monk Montgomery (who played in Lionel Hampton's big band) and Bruce Palmer (who performed with Buffalo Springfield) use thumb downstrokes. The use of the thumb was acknowledged by early Fender models, which came with a "thumbrest" or "Tug Bar" attached to the pickguard below the strings. Contrary to its name, this was not used to rest the thumb, but to provide leverage while using the thumb to pluck the strings. The thumbrest was moved above the strings in 1970s models (as a true thumbrest) and eliminated in the 1980s. Nevertheless, some reissued versions of vintage Fender basses in the 2010s do include a thumbrest.
If you’re looking for something that better mimics an acoustic piano and can serve as the focal point of a room, check out our digital console piano recommendations, which are better at emulating the action and sound of a traditional piano than the keyboards in this guide. However, they are also much heavier and cost three to four times more than our most expensive pick here.
Yamaha YPG-535 88-Key Portable Grand Keyboard with Stand   New from$499.99In Stockor 8 payments of $62.50 Free Ground Shipping Yamaha P-125 Digital Stage Piano, 88-Key   New from$599.99In Stockor 12 payments of $50 Free Ground Shipping Roland RD-2000 Digital Stage Piano   New from$2,599.99In Stockor 12 payments of $216.67 Free Ground Shipping Alesis Recital Pro Digital Stage Piano, 88-Key   New from$349.00In Stockor 8 payments of $43.63 Free Ground Shipping See All Digital Stage Pianos
In most genres, a "clean" bass tone (without any amplifier-induced "overdrive" or "distortion") is desirable, and so while guitarists often prefer the more desirable distorted tones of tube-transistor amplifiers, bassists commonly use solid-state amplifier circuitry to achieve the necessary high output wattages with less weight than tubes (though smaller tubes can often still be found in the low-power "preamplifier" sections of the system, where they provide a warmer, smoother character to the bass tone for relatively little additional weight). A few all-tube bass amplifiers are still available, notably from the Ampeg brand.
One-piece Electronic Drums One-piece, virtual drum pads include a full range of sounds and features for your hands or your sticks. Alesis SamplePad Pro Percussion PadRoland TM-2 Drum Trigger ModuleRoland SPD-SX Sampling Drum PadYamaha DD-65See More One-piece Electronic DrumsElectronic Drum SetsKAT kt3 Advanced Electronic Drum SetAlesis Surge Mesh Electronic Drum KitYamaha DTX532 Electronic Drum KitRoland TD-25KV V-Pro Drum KitSee More Electronic Drum SetsElectronic Drum Triggers Turn your drum kit into a MIDI workstation -- trigger sounds from MIDI sound modules or samplers. Roland TriggersRubber Trigger PadsCymbal Trigger PadsMesh Trigger PadsKick Trigger PadsSee More Electronic Drum TriggersElectronic Drum Modules Add a virtual library of drum sounds and more to your electronic drum kit. Roland TM-2 Drum Trigger ModuleSee More Electronic Drum ModulesDrummer Headphones with Sound IsolationVic Firth SIH2 Stereo Drum Isolation HeadphonesKAT KTUI26 Ultra Isolation HeadphonesSee More Drummer Headphones with Sound IsolationSee All Electronic Drums
The slap and pop method, or "thumbstyle", most associated with funk, uses tones and percussive sounds achieved by striking, thumping, or "slapping" a string with the thumb and snapping (or "popping") a string or strings with the index or middle fingers. Bassists often interpolate left hand-muted "ghost notes" between the slaps and pops to achieve a rapid percussive effect, and after a note is slapped or popped, the fretting hand may cause other notes to sound by using "hammer-ons", "pull-offs", or a left-hand glissando (slide). Larry Graham of Sly and the Family Stone and Graham Central Station was an early innovator of the slap style, and Louis Johnson of The Brothers Johnson is also credited as an early slap bass player.

In most implementations, a digital piano produces a variety of piano timbres and usually other sounds as well. For example, a digital piano may have settings for a concert grand piano, an upright piano, a tack piano, and various electric pianos such as the Fender Rhodes, the Wurlitzer, and the DX electric piano. Some digital pianos incorporate other basic "synthesizer" sounds such as string ensemble, for example, and offer settings to combine them with piano.
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