Drummers use a drum key for tuning their drums and adjusting some drum hardware. Besides the basic type of drum key (a T-handled wrench) there are various tuning wrenches and tools. Basic drum keys are divided in three types which allows tuning of three types of tuning screws on drums: square (most used), slotted and hexagonal. Ratchet-type wrenches allow high-tension drums to be tuned easily. Spin keys (utilizing a ball joint) allow rapid head changing. Torque-wrench type keys are available, graphically revealing the torque at each lug. Also, tension gauges, or meters, which are set on the head, aid drummers to achieve a consistent tuning. Drummers can tune drums "by ear" or, in the 2010s, use a digital drum tuner, which "measures tympanic pressure" on the drumhead to provide accurate tuning.[33]
The type of shell also affects the sound of a drum. Because the vibrations resonate in the shell of the drum, the shell can be used to increase the volume and to manipulate the type of sound produced. The larger the diameter of the shell, the lower the pitch. The larger the depth of the drum, the louder the volume. Shell thickness also determines the volume of drums. Thicker shells produce louder drums. Mahogany raises the frequency of low pitches and keeps higher frequencies at about the same speed. When choosing a set of shells, a jazz drummer may want smaller maple shells, while a rock drummer may want larger birch shells. For more information about tuning drums or the physics of a drum, visit the external links listed below.
There are several reasons for this division. When more than one band plays in a single performance, the drum kit is often considered part of the backline (the key rhythm section equipment that stays on stage all night, which often also includes bass amps and a stage piano), and is shared between/among the drummers. Oftentimes, the main "headlining" act will provide the drums, as they are being paid more, possibly have the better gear, and in any case have the prerogative of using their own. Sticks, snare drum and cymbals, and sometimes other components, are commonly swapped though, each drummer bringing their own. The term breakables in this context refers to whatever basic components the "guest" drummer is expected to bring. Similar considerations apply if using a "house kit" (a drum kit owned by the venue, which is rare), even if there is only one band at the performance.

Electronic drums are used for many reasons. Some drummers use electronic drums for playing in small venues such as coffeehouses or church services, where a very low volume for the band is desired. Since fully electronic drums do not create any acoustic sound (apart from the quiet sound of the stick hitting the sensor pads), all of the drum sounds come from a keyboard amplifier or PA system; as such, the volume of electronic drums can be much lower than an acoustic kit. Some drummers use electronic drums as practice instruments, because they can be listened to with headphones, enabling a drummer to practice in an apartment or in the middle of the night without disturbing others. Some drummers use electronic drums to take advantage of the huge range of sounds that modern drum modules can produce, which range from sampled sounds of real drums, cymbals and percussion instruments (including instruments that would be impractical to take to a small gig, such as gongs or tubular bells), to electronic and synthesized sounds, including non-instrument sounds such as ocean waves.


On the other hand, perhaps you've worked hard to build your abilities and are finally ready to upgrade your kit to something a little more suitable to your skills. If that's the case, you may be interested in something like the PDP Concept Maple by DW 7-Piece Shell Pack. This pack is fueled by seriously warm depth and range, making it perfect for nearly any musical style. With its versatility, gorgeous looks, and punchy attack, this is a great option for a regularly gigging drummer.

Before buying your first bass guitar, you need to make sure to consider each and every one of the factors above before settling on a specific model you want to buy. As you look at the various models, also make sure that the guitar feels comfortable to you personally as you test it out. Remember, you will be using this bass for a while, so you need to make that sure you are picking the best bass guitar in your budget for you.

On modern band and orchestral drums, the drumhead is placed over the opening of the drum, which in turn is held onto the shell by a "counterhoop" (or "rim"), which is then held by means of a number of tuning screws called "tension rods" that screw into lugs placed evenly around the circumference. The head's tension can be adjusted by loosening or tightening the rods. Many such drums have six to ten tension rods. The sound of a drum depends on many variables—including shape, shell size and thickness, shell materials, counterhoop material, drumhead material, drumhead tension, drum position, location, and striking velocity and angle.[1]
At Sam Ash, we offer digital pianos for any type of budget. Premium models will offer features like weighted keys, LCD menus for simplified setup, and more after effects such as reverb. With weighted keys, the lower keys feel heavier and the higher keys feel lighter, just like you would find on acoustic models. Higher-end digital pianos will even offer keys made out of wood for a real premium response. Another specification to consider when it comes to choosing your piano is how many notes of polyphony is offered. Polyphony signifies the maximum number of notes that an instrument can produce at one time. If you are interested in layering notes, complex chords, and playing over accompaniment tracks, you should consider a model with higher polyphony. The amount of voices or different types of sounds and the quality of those sounds are also critical features that differentiate digital pianos. These days, most digital pianos offer more than just a traditional grand piano tone. Less expensive models will include four to five presets including strings, harpsichord, and drums. The top-of-the-line digital piano models can offer hundreds of different sounds spanning any genre of music you can think of. Other advanced features on today's best digital pianos include built-in recorders, compatibility with iOS apps for playing along with your favorite songs, and effects that simulate settings like lid positioning and performance venue. Be sure to check out our extensive Digital Piano Buyers Guide and our Digital Pianos: Everything You Need to Know article for further guidance on selecting the perfect digital piano for you.
The second biggest factor that affects drum sound is head tension against the shell. When the hoop is placed around the drum head and shell and tightened down with tension rods, the tension of the head can be adjusted. When the tension is increased, the amplitude of the sound is reduced and the frequency is increased, making the pitch higher and the volume lower.
In the mid-1970s, Alembic and other boutique bass manufacturers, such as Tobias, produced four-string and five-string basses with a low "B" string. In 1975, bassist Anthony Jackson commissioned luthier Carl Thompson to build a six-string bass tuned (low to high) B0, E1, A1, D2, G2, C3. In comparison with a standard four-string bass, Jackson's six-string adds a low B string and a high C string. These 5 and 6-string "extended-range basses" would become popular with session bassists as they reduced the need for re-tuning to alternate detuned configurations like "drop D", and also allowed the bassist to play more notes from the same position on the fretboard with fewer shifts up and down the fingerboard, a crucial benefit for a session player sightreading basslines at a recording session.

While fretless basses are often associated with jazz and jazz fusion, bassists from other genres have used fretless basses, such as Freebo (country), Rick Danko (rock/blues), Rod Clements (folk), Steve DiGiorgio, Jeroen Paul Thesseling (metal), Tony Franklin (rock), and Colin Edwin (modern/progressive rock). Some bassists alternate between fretted and fretless basses in performances, according to the type of material or tunes they are performing, e.g., Pino Palladino or Tony Levin.


In the 1950s, Leo Fender, with the help of his employee George Fullerton, developed the first mass-produced electric bass guitar.[10] Fender was the founder of Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company, which made popular brands of electric guitars, basses and amplifiers. Fender's Fender Precision Bass, which began production in October 1951, became a widely copied industry standard for the instrument. The Precision Bass (or "P-bass") evolved from a simple, un-contoured "slab" body design and a single coil pickup similar to that of a Telecaster, to a contoured body design with beveled edges for comfort and a split single coil pickup.
A player can use the fretting hand to change a sounded note, either by fully muting it after plucking it, or by partially muting it near the bridge to reduce volume, or make the note fade faster. The fretting hand often mutes strings that are not being played to stop sympathetic vibrations, particularly when the player wants a "dry" or "focused" sound. On the other hand, the sympathetic resonance of harmonically related strings are sometimes desirable. In these cases, a bassist can fret harmonically related notes. For example, while fretting a sustained "F" (on the third fret of the "D" string), underneath an F major chord being played by a piano player, a bassist might hold down the "C" and low "F" below this note so their harmonics sound sympathetically.
Several colleges offer electric bass training in the US. The Bass Institute of Technology (BIT) in Los Angeles was founded in 1978, as part of the Musician's Institute. Chuck Rainey (electric bassist for Aretha Franklin and Marvin Gaye) was BIT's first director. BIT was one of the earliest professional training program for electric bassists. The program teaches a range of modern styles, including funk, rock, jazz, Latin, and R&B.

In traditional music such as country music, folk rock, and related styles, the bass often plays the roots and fifth (typically the fifth below the root) of each chord in alternation. In these styles, bassists often use scalar "walkups" or "walkdowns" when there is a chord change. In Chicago blues, the electric bass often performs a walking bassline made up of scales and arpeggios. In blues rock bands, the bassist often plays blues scale-based riffs and chugging boogie-style lines. In metal, the bass guitar may perform complex riffs along with the rhythm guitarist or play a low, rumbling pedal point to anchor the group's sound.
The keyboards all came in to our Los Angeles office. After unboxing them and setting them up, I invited Liz, Jack, and Brent to come in and try them out. I asked them to rate the key action and the sound of the piano and to evaluate features from the perspective of a beginner. After playing through all of them over a couple hours, we talked through the pros and cons of each keyboard, and they gave me their top three choices.
Think of some of your favorite songs. Maybe they get your toes tapping, or get you pumped up and ready to take on the world. Regardless of your musical preferences, the odds are that one thing all of our favorite songs have in common is an absolutely killer bass line. The bass has played a key role in holding down the rhythm throughout the history of popular music, and continues to make an impact to this day. Another One Bites the Dust by Queen, Been Caught Stealing by Jane's Addiction, Money by Pink Floyd, Sweet Emotion by Aerosmith, and Longview by Green Day are just a few examples of songs that are taken to the next level thanks to their incredible bass lines. Now it's your time to make your mark on this instrument with some serious grooves of your own. You'll find bass guitars for every skill level and playing style in this section.
{ "thumbImageID": "StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Classic-Natural/L26755000004000", "defaultDisplayName": "Ernie Ball Music Man StingRay Special H Maple Fingerboard Electric Bass", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Vintage Tobacco", "sku": "sku:site51500000221635", "price": "2,099.00", "regularPrice": "2,099.00", "msrpPrice": "2,100.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Tobacco-1500000221635.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Tobacco/L26755000006000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Tobacco/L26755000006000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Burnt Apple", "sku": "sku:site51500000221637", "price": "2,099.00", "regularPrice": "2,099.00", "msrpPrice": "2,100.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Burnt-Apple-1500000221637.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Burnt-Apple/L26755000007000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Burnt-Apple/L26755000007000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Ivory White", "sku": "sku:site51500000221279", "price": "1,999.00", "regularPrice": "1,999.00", "msrpPrice": "2,000.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ivory-White-1500000221279.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ivory-White/L26755000003000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ivory-White/L26755000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Dropped Copper", "sku": "sku:site51500000221276", "price": "1,999.00", "regularPrice": "1,999.00", "msrpPrice": "2,000.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Dropped-Copper-1500000221276.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Dropped-Copper/L26755000002000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Dropped-Copper/L26755000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Classic Natural", "sku": "sku:site51500000221277", "price": "2,099.00", "regularPrice": "2,099.00", "msrpPrice": "2,100.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Classic-Natural-1500000221277.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Classic-Natural/L26755000004000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Classic-Natural/L26755000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Charging Green", "sku": "sku:site51500000221636", "price": "1,999.00", "regularPrice": "1,999.00", "msrpPrice": "2,000.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Charging-Green-1500000221636.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Charging-Green/L26755000005000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Charging-Green/L26755000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Jet Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000221278", "price": "1,999.00", "regularPrice": "1,999.00", "msrpPrice": "2,000.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Jet-Black-1500000221278.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Jet-Black/L26755000001000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay-Special-H-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Jet-Black/L26755000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }

{"eVar4":"shop: bass","pageName":"[gc] shop: bass","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: bass","prop1":"[gc] shop: bass","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"bass","prop5":"[gc] shop: bass","prop6":"[gc] shop: bass","prop3":"[gc] shop: bass","prop4":"[gc] shop: bass","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] category"}


In most implementations, a digital piano produces a variety of piano timbres and usually other sounds as well. For example, a digital piano may have settings for a concert grand piano, an upright piano, a tack piano, and various electric pianos such as the Fender Rhodes, the Wurlitzer, and the DX electric piano. Some digital pianos incorporate other basic "synthesizer" sounds such as string ensemble, for example, and offer settings to combine them with piano.
×

What Are you Looking for?

Digital Piano Bass Guitar Drums
digital piano
bass guitar
drums
piano bass guitar drums

We did the research for you so you won't have to!

All our recommended products have received at least 4.5 stars overall.

Click on any of the buttons above to check them out!