{"eVar4":"shop: bass","eVar5":"shop: bass: electric bass","pageName":"[mf] shop: bass: electric bass","reportSuiteIds":"musiciansfriendprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[mf] shop: bass: electric bass","prop1":"[mf] shop: bass","evar51":"united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"4 string electric bass","prop5":"[mf] shop: bass: electric bass","prop6":"[mf] shop: bass: electric bass","prop3":"[mf] shop: bass: electric bass","prop4":"[mf] shop: bass: electric bass","channel":"[mf] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,musiciansfriend.com","prop7":"[mf] sub category"}
Snare drum and tom-tom Typical ways to muffle a snare or tom include placing an object on the outer edge of the drumhead. A piece of cloth, a wallet, gel, or fitted rings made of mylar are common objects. Also used are external clip-on muffles that work using the same principle. Internal mufflers that lie on the inside of the drumhead are often built into a drum, but are generally considered less effective than external muffles, as they stifle the initial tone, rather than simply reducing the sustain of it.
With the explosion of the popularity of rock music in the 1960s, many more manufacturers began making electric basses, including the Japanese manufacturers Yamaha, Teisco and Guyatone. First introduced in 1960, the Fender Jazz Bass was known as the Deluxe Bass and was meant to accompany the Jazzmaster guitar. The Jazz Bass (often referred to as a "J-bass") featured two single-coil pickups, one close to the bridge and one in the Precision bass' split coil pickup position. The earliest production basses had a 'stacked' volume and tone control for each pickup. This was soon changed to the familiar configuration of a volume control for each pickup, and a single, passive tone control. The Jazz Bass' neck was narrower at the nut than the Precision bass — 1 1⁄2 inches (38 mm) versus 1 3⁄4 inches (44 mm) — allowing for easier access to the lower strings and an overall spacing and feel closer to that of an electric guitar, allowing trained guitarists to transition to the bass guitar more easily.
Something else that you might like to consider is taking a cue from the bassists who have inspired you. Music is an art in which there's no shame in having an idol, and with plenty of signature bass guitars available, you can gear yourself up to follow in legendary footsteps. Take the Fender Jaco Pastorius Fretless Jazz Bass Guitar, for instance. Meticulously modelled after Jaco's own instrument, it carries on his spirit with a fretless design that lets you really unleash your creativity on the stage.
In the 1930s, musician and inventor Paul Tutmarc of Seattle, Washington, developed the first electric string bass in its modern form, a fretted instrument designed to be played horizontally. The 1935 sales catalog for Tutmarc's electronic musical instrument company, Audiovox, featured his "Model 736 Bass Fiddle", a four-stringed, solid-bodied, fretted electric bass instrument with a 30 1⁄2-inch (775-millimetre) scale length.[8] The adoption of a guitar's body shape made the instrument easier to hold and transport than any of the existing stringed bass instruments. The addition of frets enabled bassists to play in tune more easily than on fretless acoustic or electric upright basses. Around 100 of these instruments were made during this period.[9]
Whether you're in the market for a new bass, or are picking one up for the first time, finding the right instrument is the first step on the road to becoming the best bass player you can be. Researching all that's available will be extremely helpful in making the decision of which electric bass guitar to choose. A bass guitar typically has an appearance and construction similar to an electric guitar, with a longer neck and a range of courses from four to eight strings. Most common is the 4-string bass which is usually tuned to the sound of the double bass, but conveniently comes in a much smaller package.
No matter which digital piano you choose, you're in for something special. The instruments found on these pages all offer different features, so take a few minutes to think about your needs as a musician and go from there. Whether you go with a higher-end stage piano like the top-selling KAWAI MP11 Professional Piano or a student model Yamaha's NP12 61-Key Entry-Level Piaggero Ultra-Portable Digital Piano, any digital pianos here will enhance your musical journey.
×

What Are you Looking for?

Digital Piano Bass Guitar Drums
digital piano
bass guitar
drums
piano bass guitar drums

We did the research for you so you won't have to!

All our recommended products have received at least 4.5 stars overall.

Click on any of the buttons above to check them out!