Drums with cylindrical shells can be open at one end (as is the case with timbales), or can have two drum heads, one head on each end. Single-headed drums typically consist of a skin stretched over an enclosed space, or over one of the ends of a hollow vessel. Drums with two heads covering both ends of a cylindrical shell often have a small hole somewhat halfway between the two heads; the shell forms a resonating chamber for the resulting sound. Exceptions include the African slit drum, also known as a log drum as it is made from a hollowed-out tree trunk, and the Caribbean steel drum, made from a metal barrel. Drums with two heads can also have a set of wires, called snares, held across the bottom head, top head, or both heads, hence the name snare drum.[1] On some drums with two heads, a hole or bass reflex port may be cut or installed onto one head, as with some 2010s era bass drums in rock music.
Torzal Natural Twist is a bass guitar body and neck style invented by luthier Jerome Little from Amherst, Massachusetts. It consists of a neck rotated by a total of 35 degrees, with (+)15 degrees at the bridge and (-)20 at the nut. The designer claims that the ergonomic design increases efficiency of the hands, wrists and arms, which reduces the risk of developing repetitive strain injuries like carpal tunnel syndrome or tendonitis. This design is also beneficial to players who have already suffered from such injuries. This patented design differs from traditional bass guitar design by twisting the neck, and bringing the strings toward a more natural hand position at either end of the instrument. The rotation at either side of the instrument in the direction of the hand creates a neck plane that models the natural motion of the hand as it reaches outward. The fretboard also forms a straight line at the location of each string, which should improve the ease of performance.[52]

A unique effect can be created by striking an open hi-hat (i.e., in which the two cymbals are apart) and then closing the cymbals with the foot pedal; this effect is widely used in disco and funk. The hi-hat has a similar function to the ride cymbal. The two are rarely played consistently for long periods at the same time, but one or the other is used to keep the faster-moving rhythms (e.g., sixteenth notes) much of the time in a song. The hi-hats are played by the right stick of a right-handed drummer. Changing between ride and hi-hat, or between either and a "leaner" sound with neither, is often used to mark a change from one passage to another, for example; to distinguish between a verse and chorus.
Our massive selection of acoustic drums and electronic drums, world percussion instruments, drumming accessories, replacement parts, and cymbals all come with our lowest price and total satisfaction guarantees. Browse around and you'll see drums and percussion instruments from Pearl, Tama, Zildjian, Sabian, and more. Looking for a great gift? We've got hand drums including bongo drums and congas, as well as kids drums and electronic drum sets.
These keyboards are perfect for any student, child to elder, who is interested in learning how to play piano. They are inexpensive, have built-in speakers so an extra amplifier isn’t necessary, and include multiple piano sounds and simulated acoustic-piano action (aka “key feel”). These keyboards are relatively light—all our picks weigh around 26 pounds—so it’s possible for one person to carry the piano when necessary.
{ "thumbImageID": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Transparent-Blue-Black-Pickguard/K82303000002001", "defaultDisplayName": "Sterling by Music Man S.U.B. StingRay Rosewood Fingerboard Electric Bass", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Vintage Cream White Pickguard", "sku": "sku:site51500000209677", "price": "299.99", "regularPrice": "299.99", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Sterling-by-Music-Man/SUB-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Cream-White-Pickguard-1500000209677.gc", "skuImageId": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Cream-White-Pickguard/K82303000005002", "brandName": "Sterling by Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Cream-White-Pickguard/K82303000005002-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Ruby Red Burst Black Pickguard", "sku": "sku:site51500000209678", "price": "299.99", "regularPrice": "299.99", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Sterling-by-Music-Man/SUB-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ruby-Red-Burst-Black-Pickguard-1500000209678.gc", "skuImageId": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ruby-Red-Burst-Black-Pickguard/K82303000006001", "brandName": "Sterling by Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ruby-Red-Burst-Black-Pickguard/K82303000006001-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Satin Transparent Blue Black Pickguard", "sku": "sku:site51500000189304", "price": "299.99", "regularPrice": "299.99", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Sterling-by-Music-Man/SUB-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Transparent-Blue-Black-Pickguard-1500000189304.gc", "skuImageId": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Transparent-Blue-Black-Pickguard/K82303000002001", "brandName": "Sterling by Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Transparent-Blue-Black-Pickguard/K82303000002001-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Walnut Stain Black Pickguard", "sku": "sku:site51500000189302", "price": "299.99", "regularPrice": "299.99", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Sterling-by-Music-Man/SUB-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Walnut-Stain-Black-Pickguard-1500000189302.gc", "skuImageId": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Walnut-Stain-Black-Pickguard/K82303000003001", "brandName": "Sterling by Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Walnut-Stain-Black-Pickguard/K82303000003001-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
At Sam Ash, we offer digital pianos for any type of budget. Premium models will offer features like weighted keys, LCD menus for simplified setup, and more after effects such as reverb. With weighted keys, the lower keys feel heavier and the higher keys feel lighter, just like you would find on acoustic models. Higher-end digital pianos will even offer keys made out of wood for a real premium response. Another specification to consider when it comes to choosing your piano is how many notes of polyphony is offered. Polyphony signifies the maximum number of notes that an instrument can produce at one time. If you are interested in layering notes, complex chords, and playing over accompaniment tracks, you should consider a model with higher polyphony. The amount of voices or different types of sounds and the quality of those sounds are also critical features that differentiate digital pianos. These days, most digital pianos offer more than just a traditional grand piano tone. Less expensive models will include four to five presets including strings, harpsichord, and drums. The top-of-the-line digital piano models can offer hundreds of different sounds spanning any genre of music you can think of. Other advanced features on today's best digital pianos include built-in recorders, compatibility with iOS apps for playing along with your favorite songs, and effects that simulate settings like lid positioning and performance venue. Be sure to check out our extensive Digital Piano Buyers Guide and our Digital Pianos: Everything You Need to Know article for further guidance on selecting the perfect digital piano for you.

N 092 Limited series Heavy Google it The man behind this snare drum has been the official drum tech for John Bonham and recently Cindy Blackman of Santana’s fame A generously loud snare Amazing attack and response to any dynamic level Own a piece of history No longer made Offers considered Would prefer to sell locally but will ship of course if sold on ebay Sorry trades are not accepted here We have info on this and many other snares on the official 247drums store
Many students that are interested in learning to play the piano don’t start by playing a large grand piano. Because of the high cost and amount of space required, most people who are just starting to learn the piano will buy a digital piano or a keyboard. It’s not uncommon for people to erroneously use the terms “digital piano” and “keyboard” interchangeably. What these people don’t know is that there are many significant differences between digital or electronic pianos and keyboards. In this article, we’ll go into some of the differences as well as what they mean for the music that each instrument is able to produce.
Portable digital pianos, for the sake of lower production cost, were often equipped with a less complex system for the weighted keys. As a result, the feel of the keys is usually much less realistic than other digital pianos. However, it still retain the emulated weight mechanism (lower keys are heavier than higher ones), though not as precise as more expensive pianos. However, certain models include synthetic ivory-like keys as opposed to standard plastic keys.
Chords are not used that often by electric bass players. However, in some styles, bassists may sound "double stops", such as octaves with open strings and powerchords. In Latin music, double stops with fifths are used.[59] Robert Trujillo of Metallica is known for playing "massive chords" [60] and "chord-based harmonics" [61] on the bass. Lemmy of Motörhead often played power chords in his bass lines.
First of all, it comes with 20 medium jumbo frets. Since the best bass quality can be found in the lower fret numbers, 20 will definitely give you what you seek. It comes with the single coil pickup lines; you get to have a focused as well as a bright sound. Though there will be a little bit of noise as is the case when it comes to the single-line pickups. 
Casio definitely thought about the student/teacher relationship when designing the PX-160. It has a duet play mode, which splits the keyboard into two halves. Each half is the same octave range (about three and a half octaves per side), so a teacher can demonstrate on one side while the student plays on the other at the same pitch. Two headphone jacks allow both players to use headphones without the need for a splitter. If the speakers are being used, they can also be configured to output sound from the left keyboard side to the left speaker and vice versa.
Palm-muting is a widely used bass technique. The outer edge of the palm of the picking hand is rested on the bridge while picking, and "mutes" the strings, shortening the sustain time. The harder the palm presses, or the more string area that is contacted by the palm, the shorter the string's sustain. The sustain of the picked note can be varied for each note or phrase. The shorter sustain of a muted note on an electric bass can be used to imitate the shorter sustain and character of an upright bass. Palm-muting is commonly done while using a pick, but can also be done without a pick, as when doing down-strokes with the thumb.

{ "thumbImageID": "4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Midnight-Blue/J20317000004000", "defaultDisplayName": "Rickenbacker 4003S Electric Bass Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Midnight Blue", "sku": "sku:site51423495785840", "price": "1,949.00", "regularPrice": "1,949.00", "msrpPrice": "1,949.00", "priceVisibility": "4", "skuUrl": "/Rickenbacker/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Midnight-Blue-1423495785840.gc", "skuImageId": "4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Midnight-Blue/J20317000004000", "brandName": "Rickenbacker", "stickerDisplayText": "Save 15%", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Midnight-Blue/J20317000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Mapleglo", "sku": "sku:site51423495785745", "price": "1,949.00", "regularPrice": "1,949.00", "msrpPrice": "1,949.00", "priceVisibility": "4", "skuUrl": "/Rickenbacker/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Mapleglo-1423495785745.gc", "skuImageId": "4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Mapleglo/J20317000003000", "brandName": "Rickenbacker", "stickerDisplayText": "Save 15%", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Mapleglo/J20317000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Fireglo", "sku": "sku:site51423495785820", "price": "1,949.00", "regularPrice": "1,949.00", "msrpPrice": "1,949.00", "priceVisibility": "4", "skuUrl": "/Rickenbacker/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Fireglo-1423495785820.gc", "skuImageId": "4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Fireglo/J20317000005000", "brandName": "Rickenbacker", "stickerDisplayText": "Save 15%", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Fireglo/J20317000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Jetglo", "sku": "sku:site51423495785710", "price": "1,949.00", "regularPrice": "1,949.00", "msrpPrice": "1,949.00", "priceVisibility": "4", "skuUrl": "/Rickenbacker/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Jetglo-1423495785710.gc", "skuImageId": "4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Jetglo/J20317000002000", "brandName": "Rickenbacker", "stickerDisplayText": "Save 15%", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/4003S-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Jetglo/J20317000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
{"eVar4":"shop: bass","eVar5":"shop: bass: electric bass","pageName":"[gc] shop: bass: electric bass","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop18":"skucondition|0||historicalgrossprofit|1||hasimage|1||creationdate|1","prop2":"[gc] shop: bass: electric bass","prop1":"[gc] shop: bass","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"4 string electric bass","prop5":"[gc] shop: bass: electric bass","prop6":"[gc] shop: bass: electric bass","prop3":"[gc] shop: bass: electric bass","prop4":"[gc] shop: bass: electric bass","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category"}
A digital piano should be as similar to an acoustic piano in feel and sound as possible. If you’re learning piano technique and piano music on a digital instrument, you should be able to easily transition to an acoustic piano. While each digital piano’s sound and feel were our primary concerns, we also carefully considered the extra features, which can be confusing and overwhelming for beginners.
Another common form is the stage piano, designed for use with live performances, professional audio, or in recording studio. This type of digital piano normally makes no attempt to imitate the physical appearance of an acoustic piano, rather resembling a generic synthesizer or music workstation. A distinguishing feature of most stage pianos is a lack of internal loudspeakers and amplification - it is normally assumed that a powerful keyboard amplifier or PA system will be used. However, some stage pianos are equipped with powered speakers.
{ "thumbImageID": "LX200B-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Metallic-Blue/H11151000001000", "defaultDisplayName": "Rogue LX200B Series III Electric Bass Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Metallic Blue", "sku": "sku:site51278002525869", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/LX200B-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Metallic-Blue-1278002525869.gc", "skuImageId": "LX200B-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Metallic-Blue/H11151000001000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LX200B-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Metallic-Blue/H11151000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Candy Apple Red", "sku": "sku:site51278002525875", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/LX200B-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Candy-Apple-Red-1278002525875.gc", "skuImageId": "LX200B-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Candy-Apple-Red/H11151000003000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LX200B-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Candy-Apple-Red/H11151000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Pearl Black", "sku": "sku:site51278002525872", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/LX200B-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pearl-Black-1278002525872.gc", "skuImageId": "LX200B-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pearl-Black/H11151000002000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LX200B-Series-III-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Pearl-Black/H11151000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }

"Precision" pickups (which refers to the Fender Precision Bass), also referred to as "P pickups", are two distinct single-coil pickups. Each is offset a small amount along the length of the body so that each half is underneath two strings. The pickups are reverse-wound with reversed magnetic polarity to reduce unwanted hum. This makes the 'P' pickup a humbucking single coil pickup. Less common is the "single-coil P" pickup, used on the original 1951 Fender Precision bass.[53] P-style pickups are generally placed in the "neck" or "middle" position, but some luthiers and performers have used P pickups in the bridge position, or in between two jazz pickups.
A fill is a departure from the repetitive rhythm pattern in a song. A drum fill is used to "fill in" the space between the end of one verse and the beginning of another verse or chorus. Fills vary from a simple few strokes on a tom or snare, to a distinctive rhythm played on the hi-hat, to sequences several bars long that are short virtuosic drum solos. As well as adding interest and variation to the music, fills serve an important function in preparing and indicating significant changes of sections in songs and linking sections. A vocal cue is a short drum fill that introduces a vocal entry. A fill ending with a cymbal crash on beat one is often used to lead into a chorus or verse.
No matter how you choose to distinguish yourself - acoustic-electric, custom, signature model, extended range or the tried-and-true standbys - one thing that will never change is that music is a personal thing. Only you can decide which bass guitar belongs onstage and in the studio with you, so you've got every reason to check out all the instruments here: chances are you'll know the right one when you find it.
Hi, I’m John Anthony, Playing and collecting Cool Guitars is my hobby, and all of my friends and relatives know it. For the reason, I receive many queries over the phone, email and social media about Best Guitar Recommendation. Which one they should buy now, which will fit them etc. And finally, I created this GuitarListy.com and started putting my suggestions and reviews here.
"Precision" pickups (which refers to the Fender Precision Bass), also referred to as "P pickups", are two distinct single-coil pickups. Each is offset a small amount along the length of the body so that each half is underneath two strings. The pickups are reverse-wound with reversed magnetic polarity to reduce unwanted hum. This makes the 'P' pickup a humbucking single coil pickup. Less common is the "single-coil P" pickup, used on the original 1951 Fender Precision bass.[53] P-style pickups are generally placed in the "neck" or "middle" position, but some luthiers and performers have used P pickups in the bridge position, or in between two jazz pickups.

The first fretless bass guitar was made by Bill Wyman in 1961 when he converted a used UK-built ‘Dallas Tuxedo’ bass by removing the frets and filling in the slots with wood putty.[25][26][27] The first production fretless bass was the Ampeg AUB-1 introduced in 1966, and Fender introduced a fretless Precision Bass in 1970. Around 1970, Rick Danko from The Band began to use an Ampeg fretless, which he modified with Fender pickups—as heard on the 1971 Cahoots studio album and the Rock of Ages album recorded live in 1971.[28][29] Danko said, "It's a challenge to play fretless because you have to really use your ear."[30] In the early 1970s, fusion-jazz bassist Jaco Pastorius had the fingerboard of his de-fretted Fender Jazz Bass coated in epoxy resin, allowing him to use roundwound strings for a brighter sound.[31] Some fretless basses have "fret line" markers inlaid in the fingerboard as a guide, while others only use guide marks on the side of the neck.

Drum sets are the backbone of your band. Keeping the pace and driving the rhythm section, the drummer makes sure that everything clicks. With that in mind, it's important that every drummer have a quality drum kit to keep them sounding their absolute best. The real benefit to purchasing a complete kit as opposed to individual components is convenience. You won't have to take the time to pore over separate drums, searching for just the right complementary sounds. These kits are made up of drums that are designed to sound great together from day one, allowing you to focus on your playing.
The snare drum is the heart of the drum kit, particularly in rock, due its utility of providing the backbeat. When applied in this fashion, it supplies strong regular accents, played by the left hand (if right handed), and the backbone for many fills. Its distinctive sound can be attributed to the bed of stiff snare wires held under tension to the underside of the lower drum head. When the stiff wire are "engaged" (held under tension), they vibrate with the top (snare-side) drum skin (head), creating a snappy, staccato buzzing sound, along with the sound of the stick striking the batter head.
"Precision" pickups (which refers to the Fender Precision Bass), also referred to as "P pickups", are two distinct single-coil pickups. Each is offset a small amount along the length of the body so that each half is underneath two strings. The pickups are reverse-wound with reversed magnetic polarity to reduce unwanted hum. This makes the 'P' pickup a humbucking single coil pickup. Less common is the "single-coil P" pickup, used on the original 1951 Fender Precision bass.[53] P-style pickups are generally placed in the "neck" or "middle" position, but some luthiers and performers have used P pickups in the bridge position, or in between two jazz pickups.
Our massive selection of acoustic drums and electronic drums, world percussion instruments, drumming accessories, replacement parts, and cymbals all come with our lowest price and total satisfaction guarantees. Browse around and you'll see drums and percussion instruments from Pearl, Tama, Zildjian, Sabian, and more. Looking for a great gift? We've got hand drums including bongo drums and congas, as well as kids drums and electronic drum sets.
In the 1980s and beyond, electric bass was used in works by Hans Werner Henze (El Rey de Harlem, 1980; and Il ritorno d'Ulisse in patria, 1981), Harold Shapero, On Green Mountain (Chaconne after Monteverdi), 1957, orchestrated 1981; Alfred Schnittke's Symphony No. 3 (1981); Steve Reich's Electric Counterpoint (1987) and 2x5 (2008), Wolfgang Rihm (Die Eroberung von Mexico, 1987–91), Arvo Pärt (Miserere, 1989/92), Steve Martland (Dance works, 1993; and Horses of Instruction, 1994), Sofia Gubaidulina (Aus dem Stundenbuch, 1991), Giya Kancheli (Wingless, 1993), John Adams (I Was Looking at the Ceiling and Then I Saw the Sky, 1995; and Scratchband, 1996/97), Michael Nyman (various works for the Michael Nyman Band), Mark-Anthony Turnage (Blood on the Floor, 1993–1996), numerous works by Art Jarvinen.[63]
{ "thumbImageID": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Transparent-Blue-Black-Pickguard/K82303000002001", "defaultDisplayName": "Sterling by Music Man S.U.B. StingRay Rosewood Fingerboard Electric Bass", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Vintage Cream White Pickguard", "sku": "sku:site51500000209677", "price": "299.99", "regularPrice": "299.99", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Sterling-by-Music-Man/SUB-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Cream-White-Pickguard-1500000209677.gc", "skuImageId": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Cream-White-Pickguard/K82303000005002", "brandName": "Sterling by Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Cream-White-Pickguard/K82303000005002-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Ruby Red Burst Black Pickguard", "sku": "sku:site51500000209678", "price": "299.99", "regularPrice": "299.99", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Sterling-by-Music-Man/SUB-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ruby-Red-Burst-Black-Pickguard-1500000209678.gc", "skuImageId": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ruby-Red-Burst-Black-Pickguard/K82303000006001", "brandName": "Sterling by Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ruby-Red-Burst-Black-Pickguard/K82303000006001-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Satin Transparent Blue Black Pickguard", "sku": "sku:site51500000189304", "price": "299.99", "regularPrice": "299.99", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Sterling-by-Music-Man/SUB-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Transparent-Blue-Black-Pickguard-1500000189304.gc", "skuImageId": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Transparent-Blue-Black-Pickguard/K82303000002001", "brandName": "Sterling by Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Satin-Transparent-Blue-Black-Pickguard/K82303000002001-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Walnut Stain Black Pickguard", "sku": "sku:site51500000189302", "price": "299.99", "regularPrice": "299.99", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Sterling-by-Music-Man/SUB-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Walnut-Stain-Black-Pickguard-1500000189302.gc", "skuImageId": "S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Walnut-Stain-Black-Pickguard/K82303000003001", "brandName": "Sterling by Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S.U.B.-StingRay-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Walnut-Stain-Black-Pickguard/K82303000003001-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
At Sam Ash, we offer digital pianos for any type of budget. Premium models will offer features like weighted keys, LCD menus for simplified setup, and more after effects such as reverb. With weighted keys, the lower keys feel heavier and the higher keys feel lighter, just like you would find on acoustic models. Higher-end digital pianos will even offer keys made out of wood for a real premium response. Another specification to consider when it comes to choosing your piano is how many notes of polyphony is offered. Polyphony signifies the maximum number of notes that an instrument can produce at one time. If you are interested in layering notes, complex chords, and playing over accompaniment tracks, you should consider a model with higher polyphony. The amount of voices or different types of sounds and the quality of those sounds are also critical features that differentiate digital pianos. These days, most digital pianos offer more than just a traditional grand piano tone. Less expensive models will include four to five presets including strings, harpsichord, and drums. The top-of-the-line digital piano models can offer hundreds of different sounds spanning any genre of music you can think of. Other advanced features on today's best digital pianos include built-in recorders, compatibility with iOS apps for playing along with your favorite songs, and effects that simulate settings like lid positioning and performance venue. Be sure to check out our extensive Digital Piano Buyers Guide and our Digital Pianos: Everything You Need to Know article for further guidance on selecting the perfect digital piano for you.
The electric bass guitar has occasionally been used in contemporary classical music (art music) since the late 1960s. Contemporary composers often obtained unusual sounds or instrumental timbres through the use of non-traditional (or unconventional) instruments or playing techniques. As such, bass guitarists playing contemporary classical music may be instructed to pluck or strum the instrument in unusual ways.

While fretless basses are often associated with jazz and jazz fusion, bassists from other genres have used fretless basses, such as Freebo (country), Rick Danko (rock/blues), Rod Clements (folk), Steve DiGiorgio, Jeroen Paul Thesseling (metal), Tony Franklin (rock), and Colin Edwin (modern/progressive rock). Some bassists alternate between fretted and fretless basses in performances, according to the type of material or tunes they are performing, e.g., Pino Palladino or Tony Levin.
Among digital pianos, there are several differences. The three main types of digital pianos are standard digital pianos, upright digital pianos, and stage pianos. Upright vertical pianos are built with a large cabinet, not unlike a real upright piano. They are often fitted with the best hammer action key systems and tone generation engines so that they are comparable to real upright pianos. Obviously, they still take up as much space as a real one, but there is less maintenance required. Stage pianos are digital pianos designed to be used in live performances, or on stage. They are much more portable than traditional pianos, and much sturdier than standard digital pianos. Standard digital pianos are intended more for practice and play at home. They are not as large or fully featured but offer an excellent balance of sound and portability.
The PX-160 comes with the square SP-3 damper (sustain) pedal. It does the job but is far from an authentic piano experience. There are other piano-style pedals available, such as the M-Audio SP-2, that are nicer to play and don’t slide around as much. Casio offers the optional SP-33 pedal unit, which has a three-pedal configuration with separate soft, sostenuto, and sustain pedals—the traditional three-pedal setup found on most pianos. In duet play mode, the left and right pedals serve as damper pedals for their respective sides of the keyboard. The downside of the SP-33 is that it can be used only with Casio’s CS-67 stand (the two are also available together as a package).
There are many varieties of picks available, but due to the thicker, heavier strings of the electric bass, bassists tend to use heavier picks than those used for electric guitar, typically ranging from 1.14 mm–3.00 mm (3.00 is unusual). Different materials are used for picks, including plastic, nylon, rubber, and felt, all of which produce different tones. Felt and rubber picks sound closer to a fingerstyle tone.
Prior to the invention of tension rods, drum skins were attached and tuned by rope systems—as on the Djembe—or pegs and ropes such as on Ewe Drums. These methods are rarely used today, though sometimes appear on regimental marching band snare drums.[1] The head of a talking drum, for example, can be temporarily tightened by squeezing the ropes that connect the top and bottom heads. Similarly, the tabla is tuned by hammering a disc held in place around the drum by ropes stretching from the top to bottom head. Orchestral timpani can be quickly tuned to precise pitches by using a foot pedal.
{ "thumbImageID": "Edge-09-Bass-and-Amp-Pack-Red/512175000005000", "defaultDisplayName": "Dean Edge 09 Bass and Amp Pack", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Red", "sku": "sku:site51273887987661", "price": "299.00", "regularPrice": "299.00", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Dean/Edge-09-Bass-and-Amp-Pack-Red-1273887987661.gc", "skuImageId": "Edge-09-Bass-and-Amp-Pack-Red/512175000005000", "brandName": "Dean", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Edge-09-Bass-and-Amp-Pack-Red/512175000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51273887987411", "price": "299.00", "regularPrice": "299.00", "msrpPrice": "429.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Dean/Edge-09-Bass-and-Amp-Pack-Black-1273887987411.gc", "skuImageId": "Edge-09-Bass-and-Amp-Pack-Black/512175000001000", "brandName": "Dean", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Edge-09-Bass-and-Amp-Pack-Black/512175000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
One-piece Electronic Drums One-piece, virtual drum pads include a full range of sounds and features for your hands or your sticks. Alesis SamplePad Pro Percussion PadRoland TM-2 Drum Trigger ModuleRoland SPD-SX Sampling Drum PadYamaha DD-65See More One-piece Electronic DrumsElectronic Drum SetsKAT kt3 Advanced Electronic Drum SetAlesis Surge Mesh Electronic Drum KitYamaha DTX532 Electronic Drum KitRoland TD-25KV V-Pro Drum KitSee More Electronic Drum SetsElectronic Drum Triggers Turn your drum kit into a MIDI workstation -- trigger sounds from MIDI sound modules or samplers. Roland TriggersRubber Trigger PadsCymbal Trigger PadsMesh Trigger PadsKick Trigger PadsSee More Electronic Drum TriggersElectronic Drum Modules Add a virtual library of drum sounds and more to your electronic drum kit. Roland TM-2 Drum Trigger ModuleSee More Electronic Drum ModulesDrummer Headphones with Sound IsolationVic Firth SIH2 Stereo Drum Isolation HeadphonesKAT KTUI26 Ultra Isolation HeadphonesSee More Drummer Headphones with Sound IsolationSee All Electronic Drums

In some styles or settings, such as country music clubs or churches, small venues, or when a live recording is being made, the drummer may use a transparent perspex or plexiglas drum screen (also known as a drum shield) to dampen the onstage volume of the drums. A screen that completely surrounds the drum kit is known as a drum booth. In live sound applications, drum shields are used so that the audio engineer can have more control over the volume of drums that the audience hears through the PA system mix or to reduce the overall volume of the drums, as a way to reduce the overall volume of the band in the venue. In some recording studios, foam and fabric baffles are used in addition to or in place of clear panels. The drawback with foam/cloth baffle panels is that the drummer cannot see other performers, the record producer or the audio engineer well.
Types of bass lines vary widely, depending on musical style. However, the bass guitarist generally fulfills a similar role: anchoring the harmonic framework (often by emphasizing the roots of the chord progression) and laying down the beat in collaboration with the drummer and other rhythm section instruments. The importance of the bass guitarist and the bass line varies in different styles of music. In some pop styles, such as 1980s-era pop and musical theater, the bass sometimes plays a relatively simple part as the music emphasizes vocals and melody instruments. In contrast, in reggae, funk, or hip-hop, entire songs may center on the bass groove, and the bass line is usually prominent in the mix.
In traditional music such as country music, folk rock, and related styles, the bass often plays the roots and fifth (typically the fifth below the root) of each chord in alternation. In these styles, bassists often use scalar "walkups" or "walkdowns" when there is a chord change. In Chicago blues, the electric bass often performs a walking bassline made up of scales and arpeggios. In blues rock bands, the bassist often plays blues scale-based riffs and chugging boogie-style lines. In metal, the bass guitar may perform complex riffs along with the rhythm guitarist or play a low, rumbling pedal point to anchor the group's sound.
The fretting hand—the left hand for right-handed bass players and right hand for left-handed bass players—presses down the strings to play different notes and shape the tone or timbre of a plucked or picked note. One fretting technique is a finger per fret, where each finger in the fretting hand plays one fret in a given position, giving the advantage that full chromatic scale of over an octave and a half can be played with no up-down wrist movement. Also, the double bass-style technique can be used for fretting. This technique involves using four fingers in the space of three frets, especially in the lower positions (i.e., the fretting positions closer to the nut, where the space between notes is the widest). When considering the spacing between notes, this is a comfortable distance for the average person's hand size, however it requires more up-down hand movements. The main advantage of the "four fingers in three frets technique is less tendon strain, leading to a diminished likelihood of Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI). The image below (of a bassist performing tapping) shows the four-in-three.

A three-piece drum set is the most basic set. A conventional three-piece kit consists of a bass drum, a 14" diameter snare drum, 12"–14" hi-hats, a single 12" diameter hanging tom, 8"–9" in depth, and a suspended cymbal, in the range of 14"–18", both mounted on the bass drum. These kits were common in the 1950s and 1960s and are still used in the 2010s in small acoustic dance bands. It is a common configuration for kits sold through mail order, and, with smaller sized drums and cymbals, for kits for children.


Bassists often play a bass line composed by an arranger, songwriter or composer of a song—or, in the case of a cover song, the bass line from the original. In other bands—e.g., jazz-rock bands that play from lead sheets and country bands using the Nashville number system—bassists are expected to improvise or prepare their own part to fit the song's chord progression and rhythmic style.

A number of accessories are designed for the bass drum (also called "kick drum"). Ported tubes for the bass drum are available to take advantage of the bass reflex speaker design, in which a tuned port (a hole and a carefully measured tube) are put in a speaker enclosure to improve the bass response at the lowest frequencies.[32] Bass drumhead patches are available, which protect the drumhead from the impact of the felt beater. Bass drum pillows are fabric bags with filling or stuffing that can be used to alter the tone or resonance of the bass drum. A less expensive alternative to using a specialized bass drum pillow is to use an old sleeping bag.
In a jazz setting, the electric bass tends to have a much more expansive solo role than in most popular styles. In most rock settings, the bass guitarist may only have a few short bass breaks or brief solos during a concert. During a jazz concert, a jazz bassist may have a number of lengthy improvised solos, which are called "blowing" in jazz parlance. Whether a jazz bassist is comping (accompanying) or soloing, they usually aim to create a rhythmic drive and "timefeel" that creates a sense of "swing" and "groove". For information on notable jazz bassists, see the List of jazz bassists article.
Trigger pads and drums, on the other hand, when deployed in a conventional set-up, are most commonly used to produce sounds not possible with an acoustic kit, or at least not with what is available. Any sound that can be sampled/recorded can be played when the pad is struck, by assigning the recorded sounds to specific triggers . Recordings or samples of barking dogs, sirens, breaking glass and stereo recordings of aircraft taking off and landing have all been used. Along with the more obvious electronically generated sounds there are synthesized human voices or song parts or even movie audio or digital video/pictures that (depending on device used) can also be played/triggered by electronic drums.
The Alesis Recital Pro is $100 less expensive than our runner-up, but it doesn’t sound that way. The built-in sounds are good, and with its touch buttons and LCD readout, the keyboard is the easiest and most intuitive to use of our picks. It doesn’t come with a sustain pedal, so it will require an extra purchase of about $20 to make it fully functional. Although it doesn’t sound quite as good or play quite as well as our main pick, it’s clearly the standout value.
The next thing that you need to consider is whether the bass guitar has frets or not. Having bass guitar with frets makes it quite easier to play and one will be able to produce a more consistent tone. The advantage of going with a fretless bass is that it will produce a more unique sound. It is also best to produce the vibrato effect that you hear often in the popular musical styles like Funk and Jazz. As a beginner, you can start out with a bass with frets.

One of the best things about percussion is that there are no real boundaries. With talent and a knack for making rhythms, you can integrate virtually anything into a melody. It's that sort of ingenuity that gave rise to a lot of the handheld and world percussion available here. Take the cajon for example; this drum is descended from simple shipping crates but it's now become a precision instrument with tons of potential and character.
At Sam Ash, we offer digital pianos for any type of budget. Premium models will offer features like weighted keys, LCD menus for simplified setup, and more after effects such as reverb. With weighted keys, the lower keys feel heavier and the higher keys feel lighter, just like you would find on acoustic models. Higher-end digital pianos will even offer keys made out of wood for a real premium response. Another specification to consider when it comes to choosing your piano is how many notes of polyphony is offered. Polyphony signifies the maximum number of notes that an instrument can produce at one time. If you are interested in layering notes, complex chords, and playing over accompaniment tracks, you should consider a model with higher polyphony. The amount of voices or different types of sounds and the quality of those sounds are also critical features that differentiate digital pianos. These days, most digital pianos offer more than just a traditional grand piano tone. Less expensive models will include four to five presets including strings, harpsichord, and drums. The top-of-the-line digital piano models can offer hundreds of different sounds spanning any genre of music you can think of. Other advanced features on today's best digital pianos include built-in recorders, compatibility with iOS apps for playing along with your favorite songs, and effects that simulate settings like lid positioning and performance venue. Be sure to check out our extensive Digital Piano Buyers Guide and our Digital Pianos: Everything You Need to Know article for further guidance on selecting the perfect digital piano for you.
×

What Are you Looking for?

Digital Piano Bass Guitar Drums
digital piano
bass guitar
drums
piano bass guitar drums

We did the research for you so you won't have to!

All our recommended products have received at least 4.5 stars overall.

Click on any of the buttons above to check them out!