If you’re looking for more traditional hand drums, you can travel the world with our assortment of hand drums from all over the world. Djembes are rich-sounding, African drums that can produce a variety of tones. Check out our selection of doumbeks, Arabic drums, usually made of metal, that provide crisp, melodic cracks and pops. Hand drums and other handheld percussions, like tambourines and shakers, are great for impromptu jam sessions and for kids to learn basic rhythms. Our bongos are fun for reliving the glory of the beat poets of the 1950s, or for a foray into the lively musical traditions of salsa, son, or samba.


Extended-range basses (ERBs) are basses with six to twelve strings—with the additional strings used for range rather than unison or octave pairs. A seven-string bass (B0–E1–A1–D2–G2–C3–F3) was built by luthier Michael Tobias in 1987. This instrument, commissioned by bassist Garry Goodman, was an early example of a bass with more than six single course strings. In 1999 South American ERB player Igor Saavedra designed one of the first eight-string ERBs known, and asked Luthier Alfonso Iturra to build it for him. [38] Conklin builds custom ERB basses.[39] The Guitarbass is a ten-string instrument with four bass strings (tuned E–A–D–G) and six guitar strings (tuned E–A–D–G–B–E).[40] Luthier Michael Adler built the first eleven-string bass in 2004 and completed the first single-course 12-string bass in 2005. Adler's 11- and 12-string instruments have the same range as a grand piano.[41] Subcontrabasses, such as C♯–F♯–B–E (the lowest string, C♯0 being at 17.32 Hz at around the limit of human hearing)[42] have been created. Ibanez had released SR7VIISC in 2009, featuring a 30-inch (762 mm) scale and narrower width, and tuned as B–E–A–D–G–C–E; the company dubbed it a cross between bass and guitar.[43][better source needed]

One of the best things about percussion is that there are no real boundaries. With talent and a knack for making rhythms, you can integrate virtually anything into a melody. It's that sort of ingenuity that gave rise to a lot of the handheld and world percussion available here. Take the cajon for example; this drum is descended from simple shipping crates but it's now become a precision instrument with tons of potential and character.
Most basses have a volume potentiometer ("pot" or "knob"), which can be turned up or down, and a tone potentiometer, which rolls off the high frequencies when it is turned to the player's right. Some basses may also have a pickup selector control or switch, to select single-coil or humbucking pickups. Since the 1980s, basses are often available with battery-powered "active" electronics that boost the signal with a preamplifier and provide equalization controls to boost or cut bass and treble frequencies, or both. Some expensive basses have even more equalization options, such as bass, middle and treble.

Bass solos are performed using a range of different techniques, such as plucking or fingerpicking. In the 1960s, The Who's bassist, John Entwistle, performed a bass break on the song "My Generation" using a plectrum. He originally intended to use his fingers, but could not put his plectrum down quickly enough.[citation needed] This is considered as one of the first bass solos in rock music, and also one of the most recognizable. Led Zeppelin's "Good Times Bad Times", the first song on their first album, contains two brief bass solos, occurring after the song's first and third choruses. Queen's bassist, John Deacon, occasionally played bass solos, such as on the song "Liar". Metallica's 1983 debut Kill Em All includes the song "(Anesthesia) Pulling Teeth," consisting entirely of a bass solo played by Cliff Burton.
Like the Casio, the Yamaha has a duet mode that allows two people to play in the same register at the same time. However, the P-45 has only one headphone output, so you’ll need a splitter for both players to use headphones while playing together. The headphone jack is located on the back panel of the keyboard, making access a bit more difficult than with the Casio’s front-mounted jacks. The console controls are minimal, and while Jack liked the simplicity, Brent and I found them unintuitive.

The effects, on the other hand, are great, and there are a lot of them: eight different reverbs, eight choruses, and three modulation effects (tremolo, vibrato, or rotary speaker). The keyboard stores your effect settings for each of the 12 sounds in memory, so they’ll be restored when you choose that sound again or turn the keyboard off. These are likely to be less important and useful for a beginner than basic sounds, though effects might appeal to those looking for an inexpensive performance piano.


Digital pianos and keyboards are designed to accomplish very different things. Digital pianos, as the name suggests, are intended simply to be a digital replication of an acoustic or grand piano. Digital pianos have weighted keys so that the experience of playing one more closely resembles a traditional piano. Digital pianos are ideal for those who want to learn to play the piano but don’t want to pay the incredibly high cost of purchasing one or deal with the hassle of finding space for one. After all, there’s almost nothing cheap, easy, or convenient about buying or owning a traditional piano. Digital pianos have been designed to mitigate these factors by being less expensive, easier to maintain, and much easier to transport. Digital pianos are also beneficial for more advanced musicians that want to record their music onto a computer.
I then set out to a few local Los Angeles music stores to get my hands on some keys, talk to the store employees who work around these instruments every day, and start to whittle down the list. After contacting manufacturers to request samples and/or to get suggestions on pianos that might better fit our guidelines (or, in one case, to inform us of a model that was being discontinued), the list was narrowed down to seven keyboards.

At Sam Ash we understand that the needs of drummers and percussionists extend well beyond the needs of other musicians. The Sam Ash drum department reflects that. We don't just have a huge selection of drum sets – with or without hardware - and the latest electronic kits and cymbals, we have all the bells and whistles (and cowbells and egg shakers and didgeridoos and the myriad items that enhance and customize the experience of drums and percussion) and accessories that make drumming exciting.
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Double-drumming was developed to enable one person to play the bass and snare with sticks, while the cymbals could be played by tapping the foot on a "low-boy". With this approach, the bass drum was usually played on beats one and three (in 4/4 time). While the music was first designed to accompany marching soldiers, this simple and straightforward drumming approach eventually led to the birth of ragtime music when the simplistic marching beats became more syncopated. This resulted in a greater 'swing' and dance feel. The drum set was initially referred to as a "trap set", and from the late 1800s to the 1930s, drummers were referred to as "trap drummers". By the 1870s, drummers were using an "overhang pedal". Most drummers in the 1870s preferred to do double drumming without any pedal to play multiple drums, rather than use an overhang pedal. Companies patented their pedal systems such as Dee Dee Chandler of New Orleans 1904–05.[8] Liberating the hands for the first time, this evolution saw the bass drum played with the foot of a standing percussionist (thus the term "kick drum"). The bass drum became the central piece around which every other percussion instrument would later revolve.
Percussion instruments are the most ancient instruments of all, and were present in the early tribal days of nearly every civilization. Drums today are an important part of human culture, not just because they speak to a variety of musical heritages, but because it’s said we all carry around a personal rhythm in our beating hearts. At Amazon.com, we honor one of the world’s oldest traditions by offering drums and percussion accessories for every level of player.
Digital pianos typically use analog sensors for its keyboard action, as opposed to digital sensors of a regular keyboard and synthesizer. These sensors notably works in a similar way to those used in analog joysticks found on video game controllers, in which they the velocity input is converted from the key movement as well, not just the initial pressure of the key sensor.

So, let's say you've got all of your percussion picked out and set up - does it end there? The answer is: only if you want it to. Keeping it simple is just fine, but if you're the sort of drummer who wants everything personalized to a tee, then it's also worth checking out the selection of drum accessories and hardware. Full of ways to modify your percussion or change the way it's set up, these extras can give you the extra touch of customization to make a drum kit truly your own.


This guitar has got a maple C-shape neck with a 9.5-inch radius and 20 medium jumbo frets. Most bass playing occurs in the lower fret positions that make 20 frets ideal for bass playing. The single coil feature is quite simple to use and it will create both a bright and focused sound quality. If you are looking for a bass guitar that plays on a small scale, this is just the right one for you.

Sample-based digital pianos do have limitations on the faithfulness with which they reproduce the sound of an acoustic piano. These might include the lack of implementation of harmonic tones that result when certain combinations of notes are sounded, limited polyphony, and a lack of natural reverberation when the instrument is played percussively. They often lack the incidental acoustic noises associated with piano playing, such as the sounds of pedals being depressed and the associated machinery shifting within the piano, which some actually consider a benefit. These limitations apply to most acoustic instruments and their sampled counterparts, the difference often being described as "visceral". On an acoustic piano, the sustain pedal lifts the dampers for all strings, allowing them to resonate naturally with the notes played. Digital pianos all have a similar pedal switch to hold notes in suspension, but only high-end models can reproduce the sympathetic resonance effect.

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